A’s might trade Brett Lawrie – is he a fit for the Mets?

Oakland Athletics v Seattle Mariners


Rich MacLeodThe quest to fill the Mets opening at second base has been a two-horse race so far this offseason with either Ben Zobrist or Daniel Murphy speculated to take that job–honorable mention: Dilson Herrera.

It’s possible, though, that this race could expand a bit.

With the Oakland A’s acquiring infielder Jed Lowrie in a trade with the Astros this past week, it has become likely that infielder Brett Lawrie could be traded prior to the season, according to the SF Chronicles’ Susan Slusser.

With the Mets’ opening at second base and need for third base insurance due to David Wright’s continuing back issues, it could be within the realm of possibility that Lawrie is a player that they could look at acquiring.

Formerly a top prospect of the Blue Jays and traded to the A’s in the now-infamous Josh Donaldson trade, things haven’t gone exactly as planned for Lawrie early on in his career.

In his first five seasons in the major leagues, Lawrie has hit .263/.316/.420 with 90 doubles, 59 home runs, 217 RBI, 231 runs scored, 378 strikeouts and a .736 OPS in 2,033 career plate appearances.

While his ability to play both second and third base and younger age than both Zobrist and Murphy are appealing, Lawrie, 25, doesn’t seem to be the type of player that this front office would have much interest in.

After losing the way they did to the Royals in the World Series this season, the Mets appear to be looking to acquire more contact-driven, fundamentally sound players, and thus far in his career, Lawrie doesn’t quite fit that M.O.

His .316 career on-base percentage is troubling, especially when he strikes out as often as he does–144 times in 2015–not to mention that he doesn’t hit for a ton of power, and doesn’t really hit for average, either.

And his strikeout rate has steadily increased in each of the last three years.

Another cause for concern about Lawrie is his inability to stay on the field for a majority of his career. While he was able to play 149 games this past season, the young infielder is averaging just 112.7 games played per season in his first four full years in the big leagues.

There are a lot of question marks surrounding the defending National League Champions early in this offseason. While the Mets can’t completely rule anything out at this point, Lawrie seems like an unlikely addition for them this offseason.

1 Comment

We don’t need more strikeouts. Wouldn’t Murph be considered a “contact-driven, fundamentally sound player”?

Like

%d bloggers like this: